Tag Archives: Trump’s next

TRUMP WHAT NEXT

Trump has planned that immediately after the inauguration, which is a Friday, he’ll be taking the rest of the day off.

President Donald Trump speaks at inauguration ceremonies swearing him in as the 45th president of the United States on the West front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington

“One of the first orders I’m gonna sign — day one — which I will consider to be Monday as opposed to Friday or Saturday,” Donald Trump has informed British newspaper The Times. “I mean my day one is gonna be Monday because I don’t want to be signing and get it mixed up with lots of celebration.” That’s right, Trump is admitting, to the foreign press no less, that he’s afraid to sign any legislation on his first (or second or third) day in office because he’s afraid he might get it “mixed up.”

As We know it’s complicated business, so shortly after he was sworn in as President of the United States, Donald Trump rounded up lawmakers and members of his family in a room near the Senate floor to watch him take his first presidential actions—signing some paperwork.

Trump put his signature on a few presidential documents, including a proclamation for a National Day of Patriotism and formal nominations for his Cabinet picks, just after he was officially inaugurated, his spokesman Sean Spicer said. Details about the National Day of Patriotism were not immediately clear.

Trump also signed a waiver allowing retired Marine Gen. James Mattis to become the new Defense Secretary, despite a law that would have required him to be out of active military duty for seven years. Mattis was later confirmed and sworn in by Vice President Mike Pence on Friday.

At the same post-inauguration ceremony, Trump also suspended a housing order that had benefitted people buying new homes. It will increase the amount of money that most non-wealthy mortgage holders must pay to the Federal Housing Authority’s insurance program.

He then doled out the signing pens to members of Congress.

About the same time, Trump fired off a series of tweets from his personal account, reiterating what he said during his first speech: that Americans have taken back power from the government. He said the day would be “remembered as the day the people became the rulers of this nation again,” as he pledged to “bring back” America to its glory.

The Trump administration also updated the official White House website, writing that Trump is “committed to eliminating harmful and unnecessary policies” of former President Barack Obama, including his Climate Action Plan and other environmental initiatives.

In his first executive order—signed in the Oval Office—Trump directed government agencies to scale back Affordable Care Act regulations, allowing agencies to delay or waive provisions of the law, thereby beginning to roll back it back before an official repeal by Congress, the New York Times reported.

Trump’s administration also ordered a freeze on all pending government regulations in order to review and approve them—a move that former Obama also took after he was inaugurated.

During the afternoon, Trump attended a luncheon hosted by Congress in the Capitol before heading to participate in the presidential procession and inaugural parade on Pennsylvania Avenue. Later in the evening, he attended three official inaugural balls.

Enter a caption

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk along Pennsylvania Avenue during the inaugural parade from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

After repeating the 35-word oath of office in the ceremony, Trump stretched his arms wide and hugged his wife, Melania, and other members of his family. Ceremonial cannon blasts fired.

The Trumps rode in a heavily armored limousine to lead an inaugural parade to the White House. The couple and their 10-year-old-son, Barron, hopped out of the limo and walked part of the parade route, waving to cheering well wishers.

Later, they watched some of the parade from a reviewing stand built on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

 

WORLD CONCERN

Trump’s election was greeted with concern by many countries around the world, in part because of the potential for an isolationist foreign policy.

In an interview after Trump was sworn in, German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel said, “What we heard today were high nationalistic tones.”

“I think we have to prepare for a rough ride,” Gabriel told public broadcaster ZDF, adding that Europe should stand together to defend its interests.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto congratulated Trump on his inauguration, but cautioned that the sovereignty, national interest and protection of Mexicans would be paramount.

Mexicans have been angered by Trump’s pledge to build a wall along the southern U.S. border to keep out illegal immigrants, and to make Mexico pay for it. Trump has also frequently criticized U.S. companies that have manufacturing operations in Mexico.

U.S. stocks closed higher on Friday in a modest advance, marking the first time in more than 50 years that a new commander-in-chief has been welcomed by a rising equity market on his first day in office.

U.S. President Trump and Vice President Pence stand for the singing of the U.S. National anthem during their inauguration ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington

Pope Francis urged Trump to be guided by ethical values, saying he must take care of the poor and the outcast.

In Moscow, Russians hoping Trump will usher in a new era of detente celebrated his inauguration. Russian nationalists held an all-night party at what used to be the main Soviet-era post office in Moscow. In the city of Zlatoust, craftsmen released a limited series of silver and gold commemorative coins, engraved with “In Trump We Trust.”

ISLAMIC STATE OR TERRORISM

Trump signaled the possibility of a more aggressive approach to Islamic State militants.

“We will reinforce old alliances and form new ones, and unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the earth,” he said.

In between Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, in a statement posted in his name on the official Palestinian news agency WAFA, congratulated Trump. He added, “I look forward to working with him for the sake of peace, security and stability in a world that is troubled and in a region that lives a tragic era, and to contribute to creating a safe future for everyone.”

The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly voted on Friday to confirm retired General James Mattis as defense secretary and retired General John Kelly as homeland security secretary, making them the first Trump Cabinet nominees to be approved. New Vice President Mike Pence swore both in Friday night.

QUICK ACTION

Trump’s to-do list has given Republicans hope that, since they also control the U.S. Congress, they can approve sweeping tax reform and roll back many federal regulations they say are stifling the U.S. economy, as well as repeal and replace Obamacare.

“He’s going to inject a shock to the system here almost immediately,” Trump senior adviser Kellyanne Conway told Fox News.

Democrats, in search of firm political footing after the unexpected defeat of Clinton, are planning to fight him at every turn.

Trump’s critics have been emboldened to attack his legitimacy because his win came only in the Electoral College, which gives smaller states more clout in the outcome. He lost the popular vote to Clinton by about 2.9 million.

Trump’s critics also point to the conclusion of U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia used hacking and other methods during the campaign to try to tilt the election in the Republican’s favor. Trump has acknowledged the finding – denied by Moscow – that Russia was behind the hacking but said it did not affect the outcome of the election.

MARKET REACTION

Stocks were essentially flat Friday afternoon as President Donald Trump took the presidential oath, with the S&P 500 up five points, or 0.2%.

It’s not as if Trump’s presidency is sudden news, of course. Investors have had more than two months to predict what the new regime would mean for the stock market, and they’ve been generally optimistic. The S&P is up 6% since the election.

Investors think Trump’s administration will loosen federal regulations and lower the corporate tax rate, which could benefit companies across various industries.

Trump takes office with work to do to improve his image.

An ABC News/Washington Post poll this week found only 40 percent of Americans viewed him favorably, the lowest rating for an incoming president since Democrat Jimmy Carter in 1977, and the same percentage approved of how he has handled the transition.

Trump’s rise, while welcomed by Republicans tired of Obama’s eight years in office, raises a host of questions for the United States.

Trump campaigned on a pledge to take the country on a more isolationist, protectionist path and he has vowed to impose a 35 percent tariff on imports from U.S. companies that went abroad.

More than 60 Democratic lawmakers stayed away from the proceedings to protest Trump.

Many demonstrators participated in a “Women’s March on Washington” on Saturday. Protests are also planned in other cities in the United States and abroad.

 

As president of the United States, Trump should also realize he has become the leader of the free world – that’s why people all over the globe are watching his inauguration speech. And that’s why everyone hoped that he would also address the need for determined American global leadership.”

sources:

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-inauguration-leaders-idUSKBN1542RU?mod=related&channelName=politicsNews
http://time.com/4641565/donald-trump-president-first-day/
http://www.barrons.com
http://fairbank.fas.harvard.edu/event/what-next-trump-and-asia/

 

arrested-ds-160x32

https://arresteddevelopments.wordpress.com

Along with thanks and compliments to the sources for the shared data

Creative Commons Copyright © Arrested Developments 2015

Advertisements